The official home for discussion surrounding the Minotti brothers' long-running gaming podcast.
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asatiir

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Re: Episode 331 show discussion

by asatiir » Sat Jul 12, 2014 7:53 am

First off, why podcasting at the beach is a bad idea - sand. One friend kept raving about having a LAN party in the middle of the dessert during winter, if a phone gets up to its screen with sand even if it didn't leave the car, that's enough to tell you how much of a bad idea that is.

So, onto the show topics:

Why preorders suck:

I'm kinda neutral on preorders, I can see where can be an exploit to make consumers pay of something that virtually does not exist yet and there have been occasions where consumers don't get what they've paid for. I look at it from the point of view of convenience, reserving something I want to have so I don't have to think about it later. I usually don't follow reviews and prefer to see the game for myself. Not in spite of reviewers or anything as most might feel about them, but rather to base my own opinion before reading the opinion on others on the game. I always liked doing that, dunno why but I just do.

Man, MOBAs are popular:

It is something I'm slowly getting into, as being someone who really sucks but having a lot of fascination in RTS games, there's something about seeing a team-based strategy game and I find it interesting to see that spectators are given some attention. I don't think it's a bad thing that this genre is getting so much attention at the moment, the game industry as much as any other industry follows trends and this just happens to be the new hotness. I probably need to play more before making this statement, but among most of the trending genres, this one seems to be the one with the higher "good game ratio" as most of the MOBAs I've played I've either liked or at least felt well built. I'm sure there are a lot of bad ones out there, but seeing that LoL has such devoted following, Dota 2 being something everyone and their dog has on steam and Smite being my personal favorite, I think the genre's popularity debut is off to a more favorable and strong start ("start" and "debut" being used loosely here).

Is Elder Scrolls Online already fading?:

Rant warning

From the start I've been pretty worried about ESO, I love Elder Scrolls and have very little commitment to an MMO regardless of what it is. My real issue with this one IS that it is an MMO, I don't like how MMO quests are structured and, compared to Elder Scroll worlds, how empty husks with vendors MMO worlds feel to me. During the beta, it drove me nuts how I could not interact with pieces of armor, weapons, books and potions laying around the world like you would in Oblivion and Skyrim. I can understand if that was in the game, that can break the economy of the game, but that's only more reason why an Elder Scrolls MMO should not exist. Another staple of MMOs that I really hate is that "secret pirate base" where 800 players are in disguise and running around an island smaller than half a football field and out populating the actual pirates, that's not elder scrolls.

Another thing that just killed it for me is the paid subscription model, yes servers require maintenance and MMOs need it and whatnot, but when the series this game is based on doesn't have you paying for it every once in a while and still feels more expansive, it's not convincing me much to pay for it. Elder scrolls to me is living this fantasy world that I am interested in, once you give me a paywall and having to remove my focus on just playing the game and interacting to people by chatting through the keyboard, you make me more aware that I'm playing a game and less enjoying an interactive virtual world, again that is not Elder Scrolls to me.

To answer your question, "I wish for it fade out of existence" may be a bit bitter and not a mature answer to give, but I would be a liar if that wasn't my feeling about ESO in the first place.

Is it better than Final Fantasy XIV?:

As much as I'm not big on MMOs, I'm not big on Final Fantasy either. It is, however a big deal to a lot of other people including my close circle of friends that usually do avoid MMOs. I don't play FFXIV but do know people who don't usually play MMOs who ARE enjoying this one, and especially because they are fans of the series. They are happily paying for the subscription, or at least don't seem to be complaining much about it and are committed to it despite no being into MMOs, some I haven't seen in a while because of it.

How has Elder Scrolls Online left me? Bitter, angry, spiteful, disgruntled and wishing for unfortunate things completely out of my nature to happen to it.
How has Final Fantasy XIV left a lot of the series fans? Satisfied, happy and having something to look forward to.
Is Elder Scrolls Online better than Final Fantasy XIV? No.
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Simmie

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Re: Episode 331 show discussion

by Simmie » Sat Jul 12, 2014 10:26 am

I've never managed to get into any MMO, partly because I own a mac - but mostly because of the time commitment. When AJ talks about MOBAs being a full-time job that just makes me sad as it probably means I'll never get into it. I tend to play in 1 hour chunks a few times a week. Beige I think put it best with the 0% focus on learning - I don't have someone to teach me, so I think is get super-frustrated at any attempt to learn it myself.
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Angry Jedi

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Re: Episode 331 show discussion

by Angry Jedi » Sat Jul 12, 2014 11:08 am

I think the thing I like most about Final Fantasy XIV is that it doesn't have to fall into that "full-time job" territory. As you're levelling a class to 50, you're playing a normal Final Fantasy game, complete with convincingly epic story and punctuated with a few multiplayer jaunts into dungeons, all of which are great fun. The story builds to an enormous, spectacular climax that coincides with the time you hit level 50 -- and the nice thing is that once you beat the "final boss", see the "end sequence" and watch the credits roll for 20 minutes, there's absolutely nothing stopping you uninstalling the game and never touching it ever again. You can easily do all this in the free month of subscription you get included, meaning you're no worse off than if you'd bought a conventional single-player RPG.

If you do get into endgame stuff, there's a bunch of flexibility, though. The hardest of the hardcore form "static" parties to take on the most challenging content -- a multi-part dungeon called The Binding Coil of Bahamut that demands players be as well-geared as possible and absolutely on top of their game -- on a weekly, scheduled basis. (These are the people who play the game as a full-time job to the exclusion of all others.) Others are content to play the new episodes in the main story and the new quests that are added every three months with each major patch, and let their subscription lapse in the meantime. Others still -- Andie and I fall into this category -- take a bit of a middle ground, whereby we play a bunch of endgame content and enjoy progression, but don't plough through it anywhere near as quickly as those who are more organised about it. We play when we feel like it, in other words, rather than when the schedule says we should.

I play a whole lot of Final Fantasy XIV for several reasons: 1) I love it as a game, and think it's very well designed 2) the ongoing development process results in significant improvements to it on a regular basis 3) I really enjoy hanging out with the friends I've made through the game. Despite the amount of it I play, however, I still have plenty of time for other games, too; things might be a little different were I in the aforementioned "hardest of the hardcore" group above, but right now I'm finding a pleasant balance.
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Alex Connolly

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Re: Episode 331 show discussion

by Alex Connolly » Sun Jul 13, 2014 1:23 am

The last MMOs I played were Silk Road and Space Cowboy Online, back in 2005/2006. I'm far too polyamorous with my gaming - a requirement of needing just the right taste and texture to compliment other ongoing indulgences - which negates subscription-based appeal. I might not get the chance, nor feel the mood, for a month, thus wasting ten-odd smackers a month. That, and kids have the propensity to muck up any session for gaming, so committing to the social engagement of the MMO is certainly off the cards.

I've never really felt the call of the lifestyle game. F2P MMOs have the stench of microtransaction compartmentalisation, and subscription models have never sat well. I'm sure I'm suffering from misconceptions, given the space of time between MMO drinks, but again, the social element that binds most MMOs together is something I can't throw my hat into the ring for.
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