Here we investigate the overlooked, the underappreciated, the Shameworthy titles of the world. Jump in to an existing mission thread and give your thoughts, or start your own to kick off a discussion.
User avatar
User

Beige

Rank

Site Admin

Posts

342

Joined

Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:54 am

Favorite Genres

Arthouse, conceptually audacious, thinky, polarizing, masocore

Now Playing

Witcher 3, Axiom Verge, Monster Hunter 4 (STILL), Invisible Inc.

They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by Beige » Fri May 15, 2015 2:43 pm

Image

I'm making a collective thread here to discuss the Witcher, since I will give good odds that I am not the only person who will be having thoughts on Vizima and Geralt over the upcoming weeks. We can collect our dour, muddy, sexually charged Polish feelings and impressions all in one place.

I'm not sure what Tycho's post is in reference to today, but I'm sure I'll find out. Is this in reference to some kind of Internet drama? Those wyverns man, those wyverns.

Image

I have lots of thoughts on this series in general and will be augmenting the discussion with any insights I happen to derive from the new books, which I bought last Wednesday. Probably got the only 2 copies of either available in Toronto.

About the old books: I've only ever read Blood of Elves and the Last Wish but both of them are awesome.

The Last Wish:
A collection of short stories from which most of the awesome flashbulb moments and scenes you remember from Witcher 1 and 2 are lifted directly from. That scene? The opening cutscene of Witcher 1 where King Foltess hires Geralt to go hunt *but not kill* a Striga who (spoilar?) later turns out to be the princess afflicted by a man-eating curse? And how that's an actual in-game plot about 2/3rds of the way through Witcher 1? That's totally the plot of the first Witcher short story ever written, which also happens to be the opening tale inThe Last Wish. That is literally the inception of Geralt, which I suppose makes it apt for the opener of both. The devs simply took that scene and recreated it in-game, including how Geralt hides in a coffin to ambush the thing after doing mad mission-impossible prep.

There are plenty of short stories in that book that are NOT referenced in either game however. Yennifer's origin for example -- which I **hope** will be alluded to if not shown on-camera in Witcher 3. In the books Yennifer is a huge deal -- similar in importance to Triss. It's very strange that she's been in absentia for #1 and #2. She's a great character - sort of halfway between a sorcerous Veronica Lodge and Rarity from My Little Pony.

Blood of Elves
is the story of Geralt and how he ends up being responsible for up his ward Ciri. If you want to read the full picture you also have to read The Last Wish, as the origins of that whole fiasco were set up in a piece of short fiction detailed there... but basically Ciri is a girl who Geralt ends up being responsible for after some mishaps, sort of a sidekick Robin to Geralt's Batman.

Ciri is a great central character too, who is (mysteriously, like Yennifar) thus absent from the Witcher's overall narrative so far. Blood of Elves has a lot of great material in it. I very much enjoyed the scenes where Geralt and the Witchers are presented as being stuck with this tween girl who hangs out at Caer Whatever. The witchers collectively have absolutely no idea how to deal with this situation. It's way off-book.

There is a great scene right at the beginning where Triss swings by the castle and then ends up horrified because the Witchers response to Ciri having got her period for the first time is to make her do all this brutal training stuff, taking drugs and walking Jedi tightrope while dodging blows and punches and soforth. Nobody on Team Witcher has any idea about how to female in any kind of useful way, and Triss ends up lining all the men up against the wall and tearing a strip off them for being useless dumbtwits who know how to kill ghouls but don't know how to talk about vaginas to an 11 year old.

It's an example of how Sapkowski's writing tends to both deviate and fall in line with the tropes of Dark Fantasy Land. The Witcher series is full of that kinda thing, it's part of its charm.
User avatar
User

RedSwirl

Posts

325

Joined

Tue Jul 08, 2014 5:22 pm

Favorite Genres

Man I don't know.

Now Playing

Fallout 4

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by RedSwirl » Tue May 19, 2015 7:42 pm

I started a rerun of Witcher 1 a little while ago and am remembering how good that game actually is. It's just not as flashy as the other two. TW1 is a totally niche little Slavic CRPG, while TW3 tried it set a foot in the big league. TW3 looks like it's CDPRojekt's big swing. You'd be surprised at how few of these Slav games have actually made it onto consoles outside the ones basically made for big western publishers. Metro 2033 was one of the first. This is also my first time rolling through the Witcher games after having read some of the books. Predictably, I'm noticing a lot of references. Yennifer's book debut is directly referenced in TW1, just not by name. Because of these reruns it will probably be weeks until I can actually get and start Witcher 3, but I'm fine with that.

As for the books, I'm mid-way through Baptism of Fire, the most recent book to be officially translated into English. There are two more after it. I don't want to spoil much, but after what happened in Time of Contempt (which immediately follows Blood of Elves), shit is about to go down. I seem to be finally approaching the major past events referenced in the games, including the most important parts of Ciri's character development. It might be more accurate to call her the Luke to Geralt's Obi-Wan.

Anyway, Beige, there's actually another book in-between Last Wish and Blood of Elves the publishers declined to translated into English called The Sword of Destiny. They probably skipped it because TW2 was on the way back then and Triss features most heavily in the story starting with BOE. SOD is another short story collection where you have a further expansion of Geralt's relationship with Yennifer as well as the actual beginning of his journey with Ciri. I had to track down a fan translation but I'm not really sure how essential it is.
User avatar
User

Beige

Rank

Site Admin

Posts

342

Joined

Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:54 am

Favorite Genres

Arthouse, conceptually audacious, thinky, polarizing, masocore

Now Playing

Witcher 3, Axiom Verge, Monster Hunter 4 (STILL), Invisible Inc.

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by Beige » Mon Jun 01, 2015 3:05 pm

Whole lotta crickets in here. What, nobody wants to provide frontline analysis of a game about dick pics? Are we the Squadron of Shame or are we not?

For the record (as you've probably already guessed) I am knee-deep in Witcher land. At the current rate, it looks like I'll be there for a while. I've spent in the neighborhood of 25 hours with the Wild Hunt so far. Here's a few thoughts:

- Everything you heard about how good this game is is 100% true. As I'm playing it I am constantly thinking to myself "Could this be one of the best video games ever made?.... Probably." I've always been a Geralt fan, but with W3 CD Project has defintely proven... something. Something long game related about Eastern Euro and its capacity to deliver top quality games without sacrificing their artistic heart and soul to focus groups.

- The quality of the writing and narrative is (so far) exceptional. Such a wide range of pathos, drama, sensitivity and dark humor on display here -- frequently all in one questline. Just finished up something last night with the Bloody Baron that frankly astonished me in terms of how far the writers were willing to push their storytelling into the uncomfortable. I don't want to spoil anything, so I'll just say that it is so refreshing and rare to have a game that treats its audience as adults and isn't afraid to bolt "beyond the family friendly PG-13" in its core DNA.

A lot of what I've experienced so far goes (strangely) into Silent Hill 2 territory. There is a strong emphasis on feelings, emotions and the motivations that explain why bad people do good things and good people do bad things. Every hour of play contains your recommended daily intake of that patented Witcher grey morality. CD project has always been at the top of their game when it comes to sketching characters who are neither bad nor good but just people trying to get by in a crapsack world. I haven't played Dragon Age: Inquisition yet, but I find myself constantly thinking "How could Bioware compete with this?" I may have a preconception of the limits of the Bioware / EA formula, and hopefully I am wrong here.... but there's no question. Even only a sixth or seventh of the way through the main storyline here (at a guess) I can already tell that the Witcher is going to be the one to beat for years moving forwards when it comes to discussing narrative in the triple-A space.

- It is possible for a game to be TOO Skyrim-ey / Assassin's Creedy though. Geralt's world here is paralyzing in its breadth. Looking at the map of Velen spread out before me, I am overwhelmed by the sheer scope of it all. Quests, quests, points of interest and quests as far as the eye can see. I wouldn't mind so much, except that so far every Witcher contract and every sidequest is totally well-realized, interseting and worth exploring. Most of them are engaging little mini-witcher arcs, usually involving a hefty mix of detective work, dialogue, exploration, preparation and ultimately killing something. I like the treasure hunts and random jobs just like I did in Red Dead, but the stars of the show outisde of the main questline are definitely the Contracts. If you see a labeled "people are having a problem with this monster" you are in for a good time. I spent about 45 minutes yesterday tracking, prepping for, stalking and ultimately killing a specific nightwraith. It felt Witcher-ey as hell.

- Their decision to frame certain collectables as Geralt following in the footsteps of other witchers is pretty smart. Following the trail of George (of the Gryphon School) all around the countryside, hearing about his exploits, tracking down his past conquests, running into little messages and stories and haunts while ultimately building out my set of Gryphon School memorabilia in the process is deeply satisfying. So far, there has been almost zero "go over here, kill 10 rat" type quests. They've made the effort to have SOME kind of emotional or consequential stake in each encounter which makes a huge difference.

- Gwent, GWEEEENT, ho-lee shit. Is this what playing Hearthstone is like? I can't get enough of this goddamn minigame... play it every chance I get. Not since Triple Triad has a card game inside another game sucked me deeply into deckbuilding. Objectively it makes no sense that everybody in the countryside of rural mediavalia would be a boma fode Pokemaniac but who cares? Gwent is a way, way better designed game than it has any right to be. They could have left it with just Geralt rolling dice at taverns and I'd have been happy -- but having an entire countryside peppered with secret card fiends is nothing short of genius. That kid? Two towns over? Shit, he's a Gwent master. That soothsayer? The guy you got your propehcy from a few quests back? Hugely into Gwent. Plays a monster deck, big focus on a necrophage rush strategy. I CANNOT GET ENOUGH OF THIS. The fact that this is all canonical and lampshaded in-game by the NPCs themselves is even better. Here I am, playing the Baron, winning rare cards. I beat him and suddenly he's like "oh man, you're hardcore... do you know that inkeeper? Over in Oxenfurt? Runs a bar off the main street? He's got a strong Scoia'tel support strategy deck going on, you should totally play him. Oh, and that wandering herbalist who hangs out in the woods north of the pirate camp? Gwent ninja, son. I CAN'T BELIEVE THEY DID THIS.

- Crafting, crafting, crafting. Everything is made up out of things, mincraft style, and those things can be made into other things. Everything is base components. There is a big satisfaction in getting blueprints for some awesome sword, digging around in your inventory, grabbing some candlesticks you picked up from a ruined manor a few quests back, heading over to the blacksmith and having them melt down the candlesticks so you can get the silver you need to make silver ingots which you then use to make refined silver, etc. etc. Ultimately you have some awesome Glamdring style relic sword which is not only badass in combat, but has an emotional component because of all the questing you had do to assemble the bits. Reminds me of crafting guns in System Shock. I became attached to those too.

Anyway, yeah, Witcher 3 is amazing. You should play it.
User avatar
User

Bowley

Posts

161

Joined

Wed Jul 09, 2014 2:39 pm

Now Playing

Games everyone played 5 years ago.

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by Bowley » Tue Jun 02, 2015 3:11 pm

Mark, I'd be all over this, but right now I just dinnae have the powwwer!

Image

I am, however, extremely pleased that they pulled this off. How's that inventory though? If anything, I hated the inventory system compromises they made in the second game. They went from standard, but useable rpg, drag and drop grid system to WTF I can't find anything, this is not intuitive, what is this... I don't even.
User avatar
User

Beige

Rank

Site Admin

Posts

342

Joined

Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:54 am

Favorite Genres

Arthouse, conceptually audacious, thinky, polarizing, masocore

Now Playing

Witcher 3, Axiom Verge, Monster Hunter 4 (STILL), Invisible Inc.

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by Beige » Tue Jun 02, 2015 4:11 pm

The inventory works OK with console controls. It's not super-slick exactly, but most importantly it's not dumbed down or diluted to fit the console audience either. Full disclosure: I am playing the whole thing with a controller, so I'm getting the console experience even on PC.

Clicking the inventory button brings up 5 categories of "stuff". Gear like armor and weapons, Usable Items (potions, books, etc.), Crafting components, Quest Items and "Misc.". Cycle between categories with the bumpers on the controller.

Most of the time you're using tab 1, equipping swords and stuff on your paper doll. Hovering over anything will give you direct comparisons to current equipment so you can watch the little red arrows indicating upgrade or downgrade without screwing around.

The "usable stuff" tab is my biggest beef, as it tends to look like a huge junk drawer full of odds and ends. Potions, books, etc... the game does a decent job of auto-sorting them by item type, but every time you want to drink a cat potion without pre-mapping it to the 2 sadly limited hot slots on the D-pad (or the Mass Effect style power wheel which can hold an additional 5) you have to open up your inventory and start ramming around in the junk drawer looking for that row of potions. Swapping bombs in is annoying so even though I have about 10 kinds of bombs I functionally only use 2 regularly since 2 is all you can have hot-equipped. It's not too bad though. I appreciate that oil on your blades is now a "craft once, use forever" thing so you don't have to screw with it too much. Plus oil is right at the top in the inventory. Specters? Specter oil. Check.

The "crafting components" drawer is just a giant clusterfuck of raw materials but who cares? The new way they're doing alchemy means that I don't have to go digging in there, ever. It's useful for seeing what you have, but there's a neat little crafting menu that filters for only stuff which is relevant to the job at hand.

Buying and selling is decently streamlined and all the stuff you want to do (like Alchemy, or equipping skills) happens somewhere other than the inventory.

Bottom line - it gets a conditional pass. It's got some console style limitations but at least they're letting me scrounge and collect silver ore, refined silver ore, silver bars, alchemical silver and soforth all in one place without it being totally overwhelming. I prefer that level of detail to "universal ammo" for sure. I feel it is thematically necessary that making sword X of Badassery should require 5 nekker kneecaps, a flawless ruby, refined silver, a drowner brain and a pompom or whatever. If some complexity in my inventory is the bar to that, so be it. As I said before it's kinda nuts that stuff can be refined up or down the tree at will. Need some rope, twine and leather straps RIGHT NOW? Go into your inventory and break down a rope ladder for parts. Need emerald dust and a gold ore STAT? Sayonara emerald ring I just found.

Thank god for Saddlebags though. Carrying around 120 pounds of stuff last night, mostly swords and junk-ola to sell at the scrappers. Thanks Roach!
User avatar
User

Beige

Rank

Site Admin

Posts

342

Joined

Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:54 am

Favorite Genres

Arthouse, conceptually audacious, thinky, polarizing, masocore

Now Playing

Witcher 3, Axiom Verge, Monster Hunter 4 (STILL), Invisible Inc.

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by Beige » Tue Jun 02, 2015 9:29 pm

Pete (and some others of you) will no doubt be pleased to hear that despite my eggregious and wild-eyed SJW Captain no-fun-pants persona, it is **still possible** for me to get irritated - nay, even nonplussed by Feminist Frequency on occasion.

You'd think I'd lap up Sarkesian's embittered naga-words and rail against the patriarchy with the furious intensity of the zealot, but you'd be wrong. Diss the Witcher, we going to have beef.

In truth I'm not all *that* put out or anything by this week's snit du jour... what Anita does or does not believe isn't any particular skin off my nose. It does sadden me though to see people whose opinions I more-often-than-not respect miss the mark so extravagantly on this one. But whatcha gonna do? Witcher is like a hundred hours of investment, man. What's easier? Digging deep into the heart of the matter and getting to the meat of the thing through actual participation? Or watching some YouTube clips, responding to someone's ill-informed tweets and making snap judgements about subjects and experience you have no idea about? Pete, I can already hear you clicking your otaku pen furiously, even from this side of the pond.

I don't remember who said that Gaming does indeed have a woamn problem but Bayonetta isn't part of it. I would add my voice to that same general sentiment: Gaming obviously and frequently has problems with portraying shall we say *social issues*, most especially in regards to women (duh)...but the Witcher? Geralt ain't part of the problem, lady.

Trying to do the Witcher without omnipresent racism, horrible mysogeny, class warfare and oppressive omnipresent Eastern-Euro attitudes is as rediculous as saying that American History X would be a better film if it didn't have all that stuff about neo-nazis and skinheads in it. Come on guys.

Ditto people tweeting that Geralt is some kind of insufferable typical specimen of the male power fantasy and an alpha case of toxic masculinity besides? Jesus people, give a hoot, read a book. I dare you to find a more thoughtful and complex example of a *good man* in video games. Again, fuck tweets.

The witcher cares about its women. Sure, sorceresses might be all hot and vampy and throwing themselves at Geralt half the time but there is a huge undercurrent of sympathy for the downtrodden in the Witcher, and Triss, Ciri and Yennifer are at the forefront. Always have been.

The Witcher series is a game about outsiders struggling with a society that wants no part of their outsider-ness. It's full of bad people - men and women - who turn out to not be so bad and vice versa. Crapsack Eastern Europe is meant to be crapsack. It's a dark mirror of ourselves. Jesus, people, play the Bloody Baron questline.

There's definitely a place for Dragon Age type utopian games where men and women walk around in armor with 18/00 strength like it's no big thang and nobody bats an eye. Worlds like Star Trek, where gender is whitewashed away to the backward eras of history. Guess what though? The Fantasy Poland of the Witcher's 14th century isn't like that, nor is it meant to be. A woman walking alone and unaccompanied with a sword is fucking crazy. Everybody in the game KNOWS it's fucking crazy. They sit up and take notice.

This is a world where hooligans and fiends wait to leap out from every copse and bridge, ready to rape and murder at a moment's notice. Where people lynch each another in unruly ignorant mobs just because, jesus, a Nilfgardian killed my half-sister or something once upon a time.

The Witcher paints an accurate picture of the lonliness and ennui that can grip you when you spend all day wading through an ignorant, insufferable world full of bigots and small-minded provincial idiots. Its protagonists live that shit every day. It wears them down, sure, but they come out OK because they're goddamn PCs and made of sterner stuff than the dipshit world around them. You'd think that something like that might resonate, even slight with the professional outrage crowd... ne?
User avatar
User

RedSwirl

Posts

325

Joined

Tue Jul 08, 2014 5:22 pm

Favorite Genres

Man I don't know.

Now Playing

Fallout 4

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by RedSwirl » Wed Jun 03, 2015 3:47 am

So I just finished my Witcher 1 replay. Is it me, or does Witcher 3 connect more to the first game than the second? I also wonder how much of the trilogy's plot CDPR laid out beforehand, because the end of the first game starts the plot seeds that end up becoming central to the third game, and it doesn't at all feel like CDPR just wrote it along the way. It at least feels better planned-out than the links between Mass Effect 1 and Mass Effect 3.

As for Sarkeesian's tweets, I don't even dare imagine the responses she's getting on this one. I'm not gonna be all "do the research, you should have read the books" on this one because that's pretty much the vitriol she gets whenever she opens her mouth to talk about any game at all. I'm just gonna say that almost any criticisms you levy against Witcher 3, must probably also be levied at its source material. Maybe there are discussions to be had about the way both Sapkowski's books and the games portray gender. I think there are even a couple valid discussions to be had about how CDPR chose to visualize some of the characters in relation to how Sapkowski describes them. I'm even fine with Sarkeesian's talk about the normalization of gender insults through games, but the Witcher stories are an example of fiction using that to directly tackle the issues.

I get it, more media definitely should strive to portray a world of more egalitarian representation. The Witcher stories, however, instead choose to reflect and through that attack many of the issues we experience in our own world. That's basically the whole point of the books -- to portray fairy tales through the lens of our own dirty world.
User avatar
User

RedSwirl

Posts

325

Joined

Tue Jul 08, 2014 5:22 pm

Favorite Genres

Man I don't know.

Now Playing

Fallout 4

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by RedSwirl » Thu Jun 04, 2015 3:19 am

Also, the second short story collection -- Sword of Destiny, actually came out in English around the same time Witcher 3 came out. http://www.amazon.com/Sword-Destiny-And ... 1473211530
User avatar
User

Beige

Rank

Site Admin

Posts

342

Joined

Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:54 am

Favorite Genres

Arthouse, conceptually audacious, thinky, polarizing, masocore

Now Playing

Witcher 3, Axiom Verge, Monster Hunter 4 (STILL), Invisible Inc.

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by Beige » Thu Jun 04, 2015 7:31 pm

Hey Daniel - real talk for a second. You're the only guy I know who could conceivably answer this question:

As a black gamer who enjoys the Witcher series of games and books. What is your take on this fracas? Or articles like this?

I ask because all off a sudden it seems like heated talk is flying everywhere around the Interneto-sphere and a lot of it seems to be landing on the Witcher's feet.

I'm 100% for more diversity in games, but I think it's weird that the axe has fallen so heavily (and in my opinion undeservedly) on the Witcher specifically. I'm trying to figure out whether it's a case of the current big boy in the public eye being thrown around for Internet capital or whether there's actually a deep problem in what CDProject has done here that I'm not seeing. it's bizarre that the Witcher specifically has ended up as collateral damage in this fight, considering (as I've said above) that it does to my mind a fairly good job of being sympathetic and socially minded - way more out of its way than most. I feel it shouldn't be pilloried for being what it is.

Sure I do find it weird and sort of dissonant that a guy whose name is AZAR JAVED being portrayed on-screen as "not Arabic" or at least moorish or something -- but since the world of the Witcher is a woldspace fundamentally grounded in a very specific kind of quasi-historic Eastern Euro Slavicness that ties intimately to Sapkowski's Polish way of looking at things it ought to be exempt from this kind of shit-flinging on account of its actual literary heritage. I don't expect to be encountering Asian people running around Velen, or black people either, unless they're a long way from home like Antonio Bandaras was when he was playing an arab hanging out with a bunch of vikings in the 13th Warrior.

Lynette said last night that while the world of the Witcher is presented as fundamentally unjust, it is also extremely important that the narrative KNOWS that the world is unjust and presents it as so. We are introduced to things like the lodge of sorceresses at every turn and are then then invited to empathize and understand why maybe a bunch of angry women might band together and use whatever power they can scrounge to carve out a space in the world ruled otherwise pretty much entirely by douchebag men. I'm pretty sure every single ghost I've encountered so far in the Witcher has a) been female and b) become a ghost specifically because of the fact that in life they were abused, mistreated or otherwise fucked over by men and were now mad as hell in death about it. It's a recurring theme, and Geralt (as the audience proxy) is usually presented as sympathetic.

I'm totally down with things like awesome African RPGs or experiments in race like the guy is doing in Rust -- I think that's really interesting and long overdue. But as a black guy, do you think Witcher Rage is justified? I just don't buy the argument that the presence of Witches and Trolls ought necessarily to equal ethnic cosmopolitainism in Eastern Europe. Maybe as a smattering in bohemian Vizima sure -- or on the Normandy -- but not walking around in the peasant shacks of potato-eating Velen. If they ever make another Jade Empire I damn well expect everybody to be either ethnically Chinese or some kind of weird Asian fantasy race.

Also, I would 100% play an RPG set in West Baltimore where 95% of everybody was black, or at a typical suburban American higschool where 50% of people were. I wish anybody would make either one.
User avatar
User

RedSwirl

Posts

325

Joined

Tue Jul 08, 2014 5:22 pm

Favorite Genres

Man I don't know.

Now Playing

Fallout 4

Re: They See Me Witching, They Hatin'

by RedSwirl » Thu Jun 04, 2015 8:15 pm

I was all over twitter about this a few hours ago.

I think Witcher 3 is getting flak for this at this moment in time because it's the AAA game of the hour, even though I think it's a little less deserving than most other Hollywood-fueled AAA games. I can't get it for you right now, but a blog somewhere from an actual Polish guy sheds a lot of light.

I personally think CDProjekt RED is just slightly tangled up by the source material they're working with. Any criticism you bring on that must also be brought on Sapkowski and his original works. The "Slavik mythology" and "historically accurate" excuses are pretty much bullshit. The novels are the only bedrock you should be setting the games upon in this discussion. Sapkowski describes a place called Zerrikania in the books, but offers very little detail on it. We think it's supposed to represent the "middle east" of that world. The problem is, literally the only three people we see from that place are Azar Javed -- a main antagonist of the first Witcher game, and two chicks from the short story "The Bounds of Reason" included in Sword of Destiny (the one that just came out in English last month). Maybe CDProjekt thought about doing more Zerrikanian characters, maybe some traders and other kinds of visitors, but would have to have invented quite a lot of detail about the people and that place, detail not in Sapkowski's world. There is definitely detail CDProjekt itself adds in the games, but not the the point of describing entire cultures that aren't in the books. You could say the issue is Sapkowski not elaborating enough on places outside the Northern Kingdoms and Nilfgaard. The whole of The Witcher is a very localized tale. You could actually levy the exact same criticisms upon Lord of the Rings. The core story of Tolkien focuses entirely on a region that's basically Northern Europe. Anyone not Northern European in the stories is usually an "Easterling" or something -- more of Sauron's mooks.

I think it's better if you do people of color in fantasy stories with a sense of geography, essentially making those settings more globalized. A big part of the problem with medieval and fantasy stories in general is almost all of them are stuck on Europe. They need to expand and do some research. Maybe back in those days most people didn't leave their hometowns, but that's only an issue if you're dealing with an actual realistic setting, not fantasy. The Elder Scrolls is a fairly decent example describing different "races" that actually hail from different regions with their own traits and whatnot. I'm not sure how Dragon Age handles it. I know in Dragon Age 1 and 2 it was impossible to make a character who looked anything like me, but I've seen better examples in Inquisition. Character creators though are a whole other discussion. I know both of those franchises are mostly still stuck on one continent. It would be neat to see well-produced fantasy settings not stuck on Europe. Good example off the top of my head: Moribito -- a Japanese book series and anime that does some really cool things with Far East mysticism and fantastical kingdoms based on Japan and China. We definitely need to do a search on other fantasy settings that do this. I know there's a whole unknown industry of black fantasy writers. To get a glimpse of it, check this place: http://blackgirlnerds.com/

Am I still going to buy Witcher 3 and probably spend 100 hours on it? Definitely, but CDProjekt is on notice for Cyberpunk 2077 -- an RPG that's supposed to take place in futuristic urban America... and is based on a tabletop game designed by a black man.
Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Powered by happyfish | phpBB3 Style by Beige
cron